Long Beach City College
Distance Learning (DL) Course Guidelines
Last updated: September 2009


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description

Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process
Download the LBCC Distance Learning Addendum to an Existing Class form

Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC

Distance Learning Faculty Training

Testing in Distance Learning Courses

Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses

Distance Learning Course Reports

Accessibility to Students With Disabilities

Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students


Modality and Course Type Description:

A course is considered to be a distance learning course if any percentage of it is delivered via a methodology where the student and the instructor are not present in the same physical location. LBCC offers two types of distance learning courses: Online and Hybrid; see definitions below.

What Types of Distance Learning Courses are Offered at LBCC?

Online courses - The entire course will be taught through distance learning, online using the Internet. Online courses may include video content (streaming video or cable broadcast). There will be no on-campus meetings.

Hybrid courses - This modality is some version of a course with a distance component and some required on-campus / face-to-face meeting(s). The on-campus portion is either regularly scheduled or irregularly scheduled face-to-face meetings as a class. A hybrid course with irregularly scheduled required on-campus meetings will include a specified number of formally scheduled meetings throughout the semester. This on-campus meeting schedule must be noted in the instructor's syllabus. A hybrid course with regularly scheduled on-campus component includes formally scheduled weekly meetings throughout the semester. The on-campus meetings must be indicated in the schedule of classes.

Notice also:
Web-Enhanced Course - this is NOT a DL course. This is a course that is taught on campus and uses a Web site to enhance various class activities. The Web site includes information, learning, or collaboration features; students access the course site before or after class to further learn what is taught and discussed in class.

Guidance and help for inclusion/exclusion of on-campus meetings in online courses

It is highly recommended that online courses do not require any on-campus meetings. While some instructional activities cannot be done on the Web, many can be designed as an equivalent and comparable online activities. Please attend Instructional Technology Development Center (ITDC) workshops for ideas and examples for such activities. 

Orientation
A common rationale for requiring students to attend on-campus meetings is course orientation. Note that, students often require reviews and refreshers of orientation content in order to fully internalize the information in them. Thus, an online version of the orientation can not only provide this review opportunity, but replace the need for the face-to-face orientation meeting altogether.  Virtual orientations can include audio/video material (e.g. instructor’s presentation, or screen captures, etc.).

Assessment

Another common rationale for requiring students to attend on-campus meetings is factual / objective exams so that the integrity of tests can be guaranteed. However, such exams, typically used in on-campus courses, may not be appropriate for the online modality. Below are some suggestions for assessment methods that can replace the objective / factual tests and are indeed appropriate for the online delivery mode.
• One sentence summary - after presenting students with some learning material, ask them to do a quick, one-sentence summary to see if they understood the main point (compare to a pre-designed summary you provide)
• Minute paper - ask students to write a paragraph summarizing the main point of a course element and important questions that remain unanswered.
• Punctuated lectures through blogs - after listening to, or reading a portion of a lecture or demonstration, ask students to reflect and write about any insights they gained. Continue this periodically throughout a module and have them submit their thoughts.
• Concept maps - have students diagram the connections among concepts within the course. This helps students see the relationships of the various elements within the course and helps both students and the instructor understand how students learn.
• Web-folio assignments - students comment on the learning experience (blogs).
• Assessing participation in email and discussion forums - one of the best features of online communication (email and discussions) is that it is documented and archivable, allowing both students and instructors "anytime" access to assess material communicated for frequency and quality (in contrast to on-campus courses which are seldom recorded, and therefore more difficult to use for overall assessment).
a. Assessment design - post a topic that will elicit both a discussion and require a subjective consideration by each student. Ask open ended questions and challenge the students to raise their level of learning when responding to your topic. Control discussions by reinforcing students' contributions and directing them to follow up points by developing new ideas.
b. Quantity - set a minimum number of acceptable comments to earn allocated points toward overall grades. Reinforce and reward student-student interaction that results in higher level learning for all.
c. Qualifying comments - set standards for (un)acceptable / unacceptable posts. Encourage a higher level of learning and thinking, distinguishing recall from comprehension, analysis and evaluation (Bloom's Taxonomy).
• Online presentation - individual or group activities in which students present their work as related and expected (?) from the various course modules.
• Build "real life" performance assessment for those courses that develop competencies focused on cognitive and affective skills. Develop scoring guides and rubrics ahead of time to assess students' performance.
• Consider designing a theme around your course curriculum and develop assessment in accordance with this theme.

 


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students  

Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process

Title 5 requires that all distance learning courses be separately reviewed and approved by local curriculum committees. The purpose of this review is to verify that such courses are comparable in terms of rigor, scope, and conduct to equivalent on-campus classes. Download the LBCC Distance Learning Addendum to an Existing Class form. Use this form to describe all Distance Learning types of the course proposed here.
According to the Academic Senate position paper Curriculum Committee Review of Distance Learning Courses and Sections, "Curriculum committees must make a judgment as to the quality of the course based on a review of the appropriateness of the methods of presentation, assignments, evaluation of student performance, and instructional materials. Are these components adequate to achieve the stated objectives of the course?" The local curriculum review process for distance learning course proposals includes guidelines to assure an equivalent educational experience for students. The existing course outline is the basis for the distance learning proposal. This Distance Learning course is required to be equivalent and comparable to its on-campus version in all but the delivery modality. (Distance education instruction is viewed as an alternative instructional methodology only. Therefore, the existing course outline's expectations and parameters establish the requirements of the course quality for this proposal.) Separate approval is required for each type of a Distance Learning course (online, hybrid, or TV.)

What are the standards for approval of distance learning courses and who sets these standards?

Acting on the recommendations of an ad hoc committee on distance learning courses, the Curriculum Committee approved the information requirements set forth in the Distance Learning Addendum form, which is part of the course documentation materials reviewed by the Course Evaluation Subcommittee. It is the intent of this documentation to clearly identify how the distance class is comparable to on-campus classes.  

Is it required to follow the suggested responses provided in the addendum form?

Department faculty can delete from or add to any portion of the suggested information that is automatically provided on the Distance Learning Addendum Form.   However, the Distance Education Program format that is included in this form is necessary for the Course Evaluation Subcommittee to assess the distance version's comparability to the traditional course. The subcommittee expects to be provided with an adequate amount of information to judge a distance learning course's equivalency to the traditional course as reflected in the course outline of record.   The subcommittee will be looking at the overall design methodology and specific features to ascertain that a student can successfully achieve the course's student learning outcomes and content.

Do only new courses have to be approved?

Title 5 requires that all types of distance learning courses be separately reviewed and approved.   This includes both new courses and courses already offered in the traditional mode. In August 1999, the Chancellor’s Office began requiring that the curriculum for each DL course and its associated materials and resources be reviewed and revised, as necessary, when the course undergoes curriculum review pursuant to title 5, sections 55002 and 55206, every six years as part of the accreditation process.


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students  

Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC

The course must adhere to the approved course outline in terms of depth and breadth of content and student learning outcomes.   Methodologies, assignments, interaction and evaluation methods should be comparable to the equivalent on-campus class.

The Course Evaluation Subcommittee has determined that methods of evaluation used should ensure the same level of integrity, security and scrutiny associated with equivalent on-campus classes. Depending on the assessment method designed for each course, this may require that testing be done in a proctored environment or on-campus, rather than online.

What is the maximum number of students allowed in distance learning courses?

Since any change in the load value of a course from that stated on the approved course outline is subject to collective bargaining, all distance learning class maximums must be the same as those for the equivalent on-campus classes, except if otherwise specified in the contract.

Do distance learning courses require on-campus meetings for orientation or testing? If so, how many are required?

On-campus meetings are generally not required for online courses but are required for televised and hybrid courses at formally scheduled times as listed in the Schedule of Classes. An orientation meeting for online courses is optional. On-campus or proctored testing situations may be required depending on the evaluation methodologies comparable to on-campus classes. Typically, the DL students have a challenging schedule or other issues that prevent them from attending an on-campus orientation. If an on-campus orientation is not conducted, an orientation document needs to be emailed to all registered students prior to the beginning of the course. Following are suggested examples for items to be included in an orientation meeting and / or file:

•  Course access information (User name and password)
•  E-mail
•  Hardware and software requirements
•  How to prepare for the online course (CPAS 805, S.I.D.E.Road project, etc.)
•  How to study online (time management tools, Technology "How Tos", etc.)
•  Overview of the e-learning environment and course features
•  Discussion forum tutorial (interface and features)
•  Electronic resources available at LBCC
•  Helpdesk support
•  Content support

A sample orientation file is available on the Sample Online course at http://de.lbcc.edu/dlsamplecourse

What features should be designed in the course to ensure an educationally sound e-learning environment, student success, and comparability with the on-campus course?

This question is addressed in length in the self-paced "Teach Online" workshop provided by the Instructional Technology Development Center (ITDC). Check the ITDC Web site ( http://itdc.lbcc.edu ) for the next on-campus general meeting where you will gain access to this online workshop. In short, three types of features should be included in each DL course to ensure its comparability and equivalence to its on-campus version: Information features, Learning features, and Communication features. The following examples are suggested options provided for each feature:

Information features

Learning features

Communication features

Course information page

Textbook readings

Asynchronous weekly discussion forums

Instructor's contact and professional information

Study guides

Student bios

Calendar page

Annotated links to Web sites

Synchronous office hour chats

Individualized student grades page

Content Processors (self-assessments, practices, vocabulary and terms)

Announcements

Syllabus

Graded assignments

Collaborative activities

Downloadable orientation file

DL tools and resources

 

 

Can I review a sample online course to see how all the standard features are designed and used?

Yes. A sample online course is available at: http://de.lbcc.edu/dlsamplecourse   A similar environment will be designed for TeleWeb, TV, or Hybrid courses. Please contact the Director of Instructional Technology & Distance Learning for course design assistance.


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students  

Distance Learning Faculty Training

LBCC offers training in developing and conducting a DL course through the Instructional Technology Development Center (ITDC) (http://itdc.lbcc.edu/). Teaching a DL course requires both pedagogical and technical knowledge; faculty are likely to be frustrated with their DL course experience if they do not have this knowledge prior to teaching at a distance. ITDC offers a variety of workshops for faculty who are new to DL. The Department Heads ensure that all instructors assigned to teach a course in any Distance Learning type have completed the ITDC "Teach Online" seminar series or attended an equivalently qualified Distance Learning instructor training program, to maintain requisite skills necessary to instruct such courses efficiently and effectively.

During the ITDC training, future DL faculty at LBCC get acquainted with the Center's instructional technology experts with whom they will team up for instructional design and technical support while designing their DL course.

It is also recognized that faculty may obtain the necessary skills and knowledge through a variety of other sources, and therefore LBCC training is not required but is highly recommended. For further information about this training, contact the Director, Instructional Technology and Distance Learning.

 


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students  

Testing in Distance Learning Courses

Will the Course Evaluation Subcommittee approve online testing for distance learning courses?

Online testing that consists of methodologies that require frequent student participation, communication, and input, as well as gradual portfolio of graded assignments throughout the course, will be approved. This type of assessment requires critical thinking activities as well as application and transfer of learning (e.g. as in open-book type of test in face-to-face class).

The Course Evaluation subcommittee does not generally approve online assessment that consists of form-based tests (e.g. multiple choice) or skill based tests because present technology does not ensure a comparable level of scrutiny and security to on-campus classes.

Alternate methods of assessment, comparable to those used in on-campus classes may be proposed and will be considered by the subcommittee.

Notice:
•  Online tests, either timed or not, that could be easily and quickly done by an expert in the subject matter and tests that could be checked using scantron-like methods will be the type of tests that would require campus meetings or a proctor. See section 15e for more information about proctored exams.
•  Online tests that, in order to be done successfully, require frequent student input, communication with the instructor, as well as time and effort throughout the course (e.g. a project or a portfolio of documents) are more likely to be approved.

What are proctored exams and how are they conducted?  
(We would like to thank Seattle Central Community College, via Kathleen Loomis-Tubbesing, Distance Learning Coordinator, Bakersfield College for some of the information included in this section.)

A proctored exam is a supervised exam managed by an individual who is not the instructor of record.   The use of a proctor for examinations is acceptable when due diligence is observed.

A designated individual, as the "proctor", is someone in an official position that is approved by the instructor of record (a school principal or administrator, counselor, certified librarian, military educator, test administrator at a testing office of a community college or university, minister of an established church or synagogue).

A proctoring facility will be of an institutional nature (library, school, military installation, college, accredited facility).

The instructor, student, and the proctor, all have responsibilities throughout this procedure and are as follows:

What are the instructor's responsibilities in a proctored exam?

•  The instructor of record will provide and sign off on a standard written contract that stipulates to the evaluation procedures, validates the process, and notes the proctor's agreement to protect the integrity of the test.
•  The instructor of record must verify the proctor's identity, or require additional proof of eligibility, if necessary.  
•  The instructor of record will provide the test to the proctor in a secured way, such as sending the exam by mail / email to an institution.

What are the student's responsibilities in a proctored exam?

•  The student must make acceptable proctoring arrangements prior to any scheduled evaluation. That includes finding a proctor that would be approved by the instructor and ensuring the proctoring facility is available on the day that a test is scheduled.
•  Proctors usually will supervise exams without charge. However, any charge will be the responsibility of the student.
•  The student will sign off on the proctor form confirming that s/he kept the integrity of exam throughout the proctoring process.

What are the proctor's responsibilities in a proctored exam?

•  The proctor must use an institutional address (street or email) and conduct all communications with the instructor of record via that route.
•  The proctor must sign the exam contract with every exam. •  The proctor must provide the signed form and the exam by a due date determined by the instructor.

Further specifics as to this procedure can be obtained from the Distance Learning program (de@lbcc.edu).


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students  

Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses

DL courses require frequent communication with students. Research shows that instructor's contact is the most important factor contributing to DL student success.Title 5 requires that instructor-student contact should be both "effective and regular" (section 55204.) Instructors and departments proposing the course should implement this regulation in a manner that is equivalent to the on-campus course. The subcommittee will make its determination using the "comparability" standard - is the amount and nature of the contact comparable to that associated with the on-campus class? Any portion of a course that is taught at a distance must include regular and effective instructor-student communication, as specified below. A hybrid course would demand a regular communication not only during the on-campus portion of the course, but also in each distance portion of the course. The established meeting time for a hybrid course will be formally scheduled in the Schedule of Classes.

LBCC Guidelines for Regular and Effective Contact

A. RATIONALE
1. Title 5, Section 55204. Instructor Contact
In addition to the requirements of section 55002 and any locally established requirements applicable to all courses, district-governing boards shall ensure that:
(a) All approved courses offered as distance education include regular effective contact between instructor and students, through group or individual meetings, orientation and review sessions, supplemental seminar or study sessions, field trips, library workshops/orientations, telephone contact, correspondence, voice mail, e-mail, or other activities.
(b) All distance education courses are delivered consistent with guidelines issued by the Chancellor pursuant to section 409 of the Procedures and Standing Orders of the Board of Governors.  Regular effective contact is an academic and professional matter pursuant to title 5, section 53200.

Note:  Authority cited: Sections 70901 and 66700, Education Code.
Reference:  Sections 70901 and 70902, Education Code.

2. Title 5, Section 55204 Guidelines:
Districts will need to define “effective contact,“ including how often, and in what manner instructor-student interaction is achieved.  It is important that districts document how regular effective contact is achieved. (CCC Distance Education Regulations and Guidelines, August 2008)

 B. OVERVIEW
1. The local definition of “regular and effective contact” responds to the Title 5 regulations and guidelines 55204 included in Appendix A of these local guidelines.
2. These local guidelines are based on the comparability to the on-campus course in the areas of quantity and quality (frequency and type of contact) needed to validate student learning.
3. This contact must require student engagement in all three levels noted in the Distance Learning Addendum (student-instructor, student-student, and student-content).
4. There is a significant difference between student participation and student attendance. In any distance format participation is a significant part of a distance learning class in that this form of expression is a key form of assessment of student learning. Therefore, students and faculty are required to participate actively in any class taught with a distance component.
5. This contact is required for students to engage in the necessary educational activity to meet the Carnegie Unit requirements for academic credit. 
6. The determination of compliance with the “regular and effective contact” directive is a significant part of the DL course proposal approval process; therefore, these guidelines will be followed in the peer review process for any distance learning course proposal.
7. Any change to the contact component of a distance learning course shall follow the same procedures as required for any other curriculum changes. This means a review by the department faculty, creation of an updated Distance Learning Addendum (with full signatures), and submission of this proposal through the established curriculum process.
8. For situations in which instructors need to deviate from the guidelines provided in this document, the instructor must follow the equivalent and comparable procedures used for on-campus versions of the course, as well as standard LBCC policies, regulations and student code of collegiate behavior.

Minimum requirements are enumerated below, following by appendices, which include the Title 5 regulation, tips for success, and administrative practices.

C. MINIMUM REGULAR AND EFFECTIVE CONTACT REQUIREMENTS
1. Instructors should be engaged with students and students should be interacting with each other and with the course content to promote an e-learning environment that is conducive to student success, One primary goal in a distance course is for students learn from each other. Students and Instructors have a rich diversity of backgrounds and experiences that can bring many fresh, and perhaps unexpected, perspectives to class discussions. These interactions increase both student learning and student retention.
2. Turn around response time to student inquiries should be one to two business days. Faculty are required to facilitate contact sufficient number of times every week to administer the class and respond to students on the course site.
3. Specific beginning and ending dates for courses need to be clearly defined for students as well as assignment and test dates throughout the course.
4. Any accessible medium (that is in compliance with Section 508 and the CCCO Distance Learning Access Guidelines) is acceptable for facilitating the regular and effective contact.
5. Ensure that Netiquette rules are always posted on the syllabus and/or course pages that include communication and collaboration activities, or any other types of contact.
6. In addition to administering the course, a faculty member must provide communication or collaboration activities involving contact and interactions on a weekly basis. This would allow students the opportunity to discuss the learning materials before moving on to the next week’s topics and materials. It is important to remind students not to “work” ahead on next week’s lecture to ensure that the previous week’s discussions have been concluded.
7. Students are required to interact with the instructor, other students, and the course material each week through the course period. Participation can occur on different pages, such as discussion forums, blogs, interactive articles, self-assessments and content processors, etc.
8. The instructor must frequently monitor any contact activity in which students interact with their peers.
9. Weekly learning material triggers in-depth communication exchanges. Quantity is important, but the quality of the communication is more important. To earn full credit for a course, a student should participate in a meaningful manner  (not just “I agree” type of notes) in communication or collaboration activities every week. For example, a quality discussion post requires the student to use higher order thinking skills (e.g. critical thinking, problem solving) in order to respond in a way that will allow the instructor to tie their answer to specific student learning outcomes.
10. In judging the participation grade of the students in the course, the instructor ensures: (1) relevance of the student input to the nature of the communication; (2) quality of the content of communication; (3) presentation of ideas (grammar, punctuation, organization, and style).

How are instructors of DL courses expected to communicate with their students to maintain the course quality and contribute to their student success?

Instructors are expected to communicate with their students through (1) individual email and (2) on the discussion forums in response to students' posts on specific pre-designed topics, and (3) via general announcements to all the students.

1. E-Mail
- Prior to the beginning of the course - Instructors are expected to send a "welcome" email to all registered students. An orientation file needs to be attached to the email providing the students access information, as well as information regarding the course.
- During the first two weeks of the course - instructors are expected to initiate contact with all students who did not contact them at least once a week, to verify that they were able to access and navigate the course properly, and to remind the students of their expected activities for that week, as well as the to offer assistance with the required assignment(s) and discussion(s).
- During the rest of the course - instructors are expected to respond to individual email message within 24 hours. Individual reminders of class assignments and required activities are best if both are sent individually and announced on the course Announcement page. This form of individual attention has been proven to have a direct effect on students' attitudes and consequently in their success.

2. Discussion Forums
Instructors are expected to read all of their students' posts in each module and to mark them as part of the grade as determined in each course. While instructors do not have to respond to each student post, they are required to monitor that students stay on the discussion topic designed for the class, and that they respond to other students' posts in addition to responding to the instructor's topic. Students appreciate when instructors comment on their post as it helps them clarify content and / or validate their comprehension and analysis of the material they are learning.

3. Announcements
Announcements on the course Announcement page are used to address all students at once, for general information such as additions made to learning modules, test date reminders, etc. An e-mail distribution list can be used for the same purpose, but should not replace the Announcement page, since some students may access the course without reading their email first.


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students  

Distance Learning Course Reports

Distance Learning courses require the same reports as on-campus courses (such as first census or grade sheets)

How is DL student attendance determined for the first census report?

To ensure that students attend class and access the material designed for the class, instructors are expected to include at least one content-specific assignment due before first census date (first census date is the Monday nearest one fifth of the course). If a student does not hand in the assignment (or enter a content-related post to the discussion forum) by first census date, s/he should be considered a No Show and dropped from the course. While initial contact for class management purposes and posting of a student bio indicate the student had some involvement in the course, these parameters are not content-specific and thus are insufficient to determine first census attendance in the class.


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students  

Accessibility to Students With Disabilities

Both State and Federal law require community colleges to operate all programs and activities in a manner, which is accessible to students with disabilities. Accordingly, as the system develops its capacity for creation of technology-based instructional resources and the delivery of distance learning, it must proceed with the needs of all students in mind, including the needs of students with disabilities. Under the CCC DE Access Guidelines, Chapter 6, Standards and Criteria for Courses, Section 55200 ("Definition and Application"), CA Code 11135, and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act as amended in 1998, the Access Board has established standards for electronic and information technology. The regulations require that electronic and information technologies developed, procured, maintained or used are accessible to students with disabilities. The college, through the ITDC, provides the necessary training and resources for faculty to ensure accessibility in Web-mediated courses, Local LBCC/ITDC accessibility guidelines and information are available on the Web Accessibility in e-Learning page (http://itdc.lbcc.edu/accessibility)


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students  

Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students

What resources are available for distance learning instructors at LBCC?

•  Sample online course - http://de.lbcc.edu/dlsamplecourse
•  Procedure and Instructions for New LBCC Online faculty - http://de.lbcc.edu/guidelines/newonlineinst.html
•  Guidelines and Resources for New LBCC Online Instructors - http://de.lbcc.edu/guidelines/index.html
•  DL Frequently Asked Questions - enclosed with this Welcome sheet.
•  "S.I.D.E.Road: Success in Distance Education" - preparing your students for their DL experience - http://de.lbcc.edu/sideroad
•  Teach Online workshop - on the e-Learning Zone at http://ezone.lbcc.edu (Contact the Distance Learning department for more information)
•  Faculty HelpDesk:
    a. Web - http://itdc.lbcc.edu/fachelpdesk
    b. Phone - 562.938.4357

What resources are available for distance learning students at LBCC?

•  General Distance Learning Program information : (562) 938-4025
•  HelpDesk for Technical support
    a. Phone (for registered Distance Learning students only): (562)938-4818
    b. Web - http://de.lbcc.edu/helpdesk/
•  "S.I.D.E.Road: Success in Distance Education" - preparing students for their DL experience - http://de.lbcc.edu/sideroad
•  Online counseling - http://onlinecounseling.lbcc.edu
•  Online Library - http://lib.lbcc.edu/
•  Online bookstore - http://www.lbccbookstore.com/
•  Online Financial Aid - http://fina.lbcc.edu/


Distance Learning Courses - Modality Description Curriculum Committee DL Course Approval Process Characteristics of Distance Learning Courses at LBCC Distance Learning Faculty Training Testing in Distance Learning Courses
Instructor - Student Contact in Distance Learning Courses Distance Learning Course Reports Accessibility to Students With Disabilities Resources for Distance Learning Instructors and Students